Architecture of the Exhibition

Architecture of the Exhibition

On entering the exhibition hall, the visitor first encountered the central title wall, which included two family photos: a Jewish family, and a Sinti family. At the entrance to the exhibition space, one was met with a survivor’s quotation: “…But it all began in the bright light of a fair summer’s day, of which our city knows but few…” 



The central space of the exhibition was divided by five long wall panels. This provided the architectural setting for presenting the exhibition on walls, in display cabinets, on audio and video stations, in reading folders and on computer stations. 



Recalling the deportation trains, the stylized silhouette of a historical train car was cut out from the middle of every long wall panel. These cut-outs framed a passageway running clear through the exhibition, connecting two larger walls, each with a large-scale photo. These showed the point of origin, being Hannoverscher Bahnhof, and the “destination” of the deportations: the ghettos and extermination camps, presented as a collage. 



On following or crossing this passageway (symbolizing the “railroad track”), visitors were always confronted with either one photo or the other: point of origin and destination, “beginning and end.”